Some of the most tragic types of accidents are those which cannot be avoided; it renders a feeling of helplessness to all who are affected. The fact is that although we aim to be proactive and safe drivers, other people are simply not as conscientious, or quite possibly, the circumstances that lead to the accident are simply unavoidable. But sadly, when other people make reckless decisions on the road, innocent people can feel the repercussions.

In a recent Oceanside case, that’s precisely what happened when a Ford F-150 careened through a red light and collided with a Kia sedan, killing the innocent driver of that vehicle. It appears the woman, 29, was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Ford F-150 also collided with another truck, a Chevy pickup. The driver of that car was treated for minor personal injury. Yet another car, another truck, was hit when the Kia was propelled into the vehicle ahead. Those sustaining injury were treated at Scripps La Jolla Hospital where they were flown by helicopter.

The accident occurred earlier this month on State Route 78 in Oceanside where Vista Way turns into Moreno Street. The intersection where the car accident occurred has been known for its dangerous features including its abrupt transition from close-to-freeway speeds into slow, neighborhood traffic.

The driver in question, a 62-year old man, was at fault according to reports but he is not suspected to have been driving under the influence.

As for the dangers of the neighborhood, residents said the area is notorious for constant close-calls.

Neighbors have been so concerned about the area that they contacted the city of Oceanside. According to officials, some safety measures have been put in place.

“They’ve put in little islands to slow down traffic, designating turn lanes. You can only turn right as opposed to wanting to go eastbound,” police officials said. “They have tried some calming effects. They even put in the radar that lights up how fast you’re going.”

CAN DRIVERS DO ANYTHING TO BE PROACTIVE?

This story is especially harrowing because there was nothing the woman in the Kia could have done to prevent the accident. Tragically, she passed away due to circumstances beyond her control. Accidents like these can often strike fear – after all, what can drivers do to stay safe? It seems like there are no options, but that certainly is not the case. You can be proactive when it comes to your safety on Oceanside roadways. Here are some ideas.

TRAVEL OTHER ROADS, WHEN POSSIBLE, BESIDES THE 76 AND THE 78

The truth is that the 76 and the 78 are essential traveling roads for the Oceanside and Vista areas. They are completely central to the area but they are also known for their dangerous features. If you’re like many San Diegans who travel the 76 and the 78, you’ve probably seen the numerous signs that read, “It’s no Accident Staying Safe” near the roadways. Can you really avoid these roads? Yes! There are countless back roads that can get you to where you are going. When it makes sense, use the more private and less traveled roadways. For example, N. River Road, Gopher Canyon, Mission Avenue and Oceanside Boulevard may be good choices when you want to forego the 76 and the 78.

WRITE TO THE CITY OF OCEANSIDE

Although officials say that the city of Oceanside has taken proactive measures to make the 78 safer, there could be more done to ensure that drivers and pedestrians are better protected. If you are a resident of the area – or even if you’re not but you travel these roadways often – it’s a good idea to write about your concerns to the city. Let your voice be heard! For a maintenance request, click here to submit with the California Department of Transportation. To write directly to Oceanside city staff, click here.

 

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